How to repair, reattach convertible rear window - Maintenance and Repair Forum

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How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Saturday, June 05, 2010 2:10 PM
The Problem:
The rear window in the convertible roof becomes detached from the canvas.

Disclaimer:
I offer these instructions to be helpful, as I have benefited from others who have posted instructions. I don't guarantee the accuracy of these instructions, nor your results should you choose to follow them. Personal or property injury could result from following these instructions. Follow the instructions from the glue and primer vendor. Be careful. And if you don't feel comfortable doing this kind of work, please hire a trained professional to do your repair work.

Time required:
This should take about 2-3 hours of work and at least a day for the glue to cure, depending on temperature and humidity.

Tools & materials required:
* Razor scraper.
* A piece of sandpaper. (Maybe 60-100 grit or so. Used is fine.)
* Utility knife.
* A fine point (preferably) dry-erase marker.
* 9 stick, preferably about 1 thick. (See photos.)
* Packing tape.
* A couple of rags or towels.
* A roll of paper towels.
* 3M Glass Primer- product #08682 (30ml) or #08681 (125ml). 30ml is more than enough. Available online.
* 3M Windo-Weld adhesive 10.5 oz. tube [#08609] . Available online.
* A caulking gun.
* Several sets of latex gloves.
* About 8 full sized towels (like you would use to take a shower), rolled up tight as shown in photos.
* A drop cloth or two (to protect your seats from glue).
* A flashlight, portable electric lantern, or utility light, so that you can see well and work inside the dark window-well.
* Optionally, but I'd recommend, an assistant for about 5 minutes during final gluing and taping stage.

How to fix it:
NOTE:
These instructions (and photos) are based on my 1996 Cavalier convertible coupe but are probably largely applicable to most convertibles of any make or model where the glass is glued to the canvas.

After gluing my window, it felt very secure and I feel confident about it holding long term. However, I am posting these instructions just one week after gluing. I'll try to remember to check-in every few months to let you know if it continues to hold. I'll check-in right away and let you know (by posting below) if it fails.

BACKGROUND:
The bottom edge and the lower half of the side edges of my rear window became detached. I did a lot of research on how to fix it. Many people had posted online that they had tried many different types of glue, but the general consensus was that standard glues (epoxy, gorilla glue, etc.) don't hold in the long run. There are glues that stick to canvas, and there glues that stick to glass, but when gluing glass to canvas you need a specialized primer and glue like the 3M products listed above. (There may be other brands or suitable glues. I don't know.) I could not find the aforementioned 3M adhesive products in auto stores, hardware stores, or retail stores like Walmart, so I had to order them online. They were easy to find online, simply by searching for the product name and number listed above. I got the primer and glue shipped to my house for about $30. The smallest sizes available were at least 10 times more than I needed, and apparently the glue & primer have a very short shelf-life so feel free to get the smallest size available. The instructions for the glue and primer can be found on the 3M website.

STEP BY STEP INSTRUCTIONS:
1) Unlatch the roof, raise it about 6", and prop it up above the windshield with something (like a bunched up towel) as show in the photo. This relieves pressure from the back window.
2) Detach the interior plug for the window defroster if that will be in the way of where you need to glue.
3) Using a razor scraper, scrape all of the old glue from the areas of the window that have come detached.
4) Use sandpaper to rough up the shiny-smooth portions of the canvas (inside & outside pieces) that will attach to the glass. I'm not 100% sure that this step is necessary, but it makes sense since it give the canvas some tooth for the glue to attach.
3) With a damp rag and a dry towel, clean and dry the entire window (on both sides), the surrounding canvas, and the trunk lid. You'll need that all to be cleaned and dry to the you can properly glue the window and tack it into place with tape.
4) Cut a stick to about 8-9 inches. I cut a 45 degree angle on a 1" square bar of scrap wood, 9 inches long. The angled end then slides snugly behind the seatback and props up the back window. Fold over a small piece of packing tape so that it's sticky on both sides, and put it on one end (the blunt end) of the stick. This will keep the stick from sliding across the inside of the window. Then place the stick as shown (behind the center of the seatback) to prop up the window. Be sure to place the rod on the window between the defroster lines so that you don't accidentally take off any defroster paint. (See photos.)
5) Place a drop cloth on the back seat, over the seatback, and if you're really fussy, in the window well, just in case you drip some (black) primer, (black) glue, or drop the magic marker.
6) Now that the window is propped up, test-fit the canvas on both sides, and tape it in place with a few vertically placed strips of packing tape such that there are no wrinkles in the canvas.
7) Mark the window along the canvas line on both sides with a magic marker so that you'll know where to paint the primer.
8) Throw out the old tape that you used for the test fit.
9) Put on some disposable latex gloves. I'd actually recommend putting on double layers of gloves so that, if necessary, you can quickly strip off the top pair if they get messed up while you're gluing. You don't want to get the primer or glue on the canvas, car body, or interior fabric, and I'd say that the most likely way that you'll do that is by touching something with a dirty glove. The workable time of the glue is 15 minutes so you won't have much time to get the job done.
10) Paint the 3M glass primer onto the window (both sides) using the magic marker line as your guide. FYI: The primer is black. The instructions say to use a wool dauber, but I just used a small disposable paint brush. You will need to throw the paint brush away so make sure that it's disposable. Allow the primer to dry at least 10 minutes (per the instructions on the label).
11) Remove the pull-tab from the back of the 3M Windo-Weld glue canister and place it into a caulking gun. FYI: The glue is black.
12) Cut the tip of the 3M Windo-Weld glue canister at an angle as described in the directions for that product.
13) The instructions on the glue say that you just need to lay a bead of glue along the window and then attach the canvas. But I wanted to be certain to get the maximum possible surface contact so I also used my double-glove-covered index finger to rub glue across the entire portion of the exterior side of the window to be glued, as well as rubbing the glue into the entire part of the exterior canvas to be glued. Then I quickly threw away that top layer glove, leaving me with a clean glove beneath. I'm not sure that's all necessary, but that's what I did, and I'd do it again. Don't use so much glue that it will squeeze out onto the window and make a mess. A thin (say 1mm) layer on both the glass and the canvas should do the trick.
14) With clean latex gloves on your hand, attach the exterior-side canvas to the window, and tape it securely into place with some packing tape, as shown in the pictures, at first with some long vertical strips, and then with some horizontal strips running the length of the canvas. Press the canvas and the tape snugly in place, using the primer, glue, as your guideline. The glue is very tacky almost immediately, so the canvas sticks almost immediately, but is workable for a few minute or two. You can do this alone, but you may want to enlist an assistant for the gluing and taping portion. It's pretty hard to rip off new tape with latex gloves. It's OK if some glue squeezes out onto the window because you can scrape it off later. It's not OK if glue gets on the canvas.
15) With clean latex gloves, repeat the gluing and taping process from the previous step for the interior side of the window and the interior canvas.
16) Use some rolled up towels (as shown in the photos) to hold the interior canvas against the window while the glue dries. (Otherwise the portion of the canvas which is not next to the tape, will tend to fall away from the window.
17) Let the glue set according to the curing times listed in the instructions. The curing times vary greatly (from about 1 hour to 100 hours) depending on temperature and humidity. (The more humid, the faster it cures since it's water activated.) I let mine cure for about 3 days in arid California, just to be sure.
18) After the glue dries, remove the tape, the towels, and the prop-up stick.
19) If there is excess glue on the window (which is likely), use a razor scraper or utility knife, running the knife along the edge of the canvas, inside and outside, (perpendicular to the window) to cut a line across the glue, so that when you scrape off the glue, it will peel away from the window at the canvas line. Be careful not to cut the canvas.
20) Using a razor scraper to scrape any excess glue from the window, inside and out. Be careful not to scrape off the defroster paint line on the interior.
21) Remove the towel that is propping up the roof above the windshield, and reattach the defroster plugs if you've disconnected them.
22) Pray that it holds and close the roof. Good luck!

Photos are at the following link:
http://picasaweb.google.com/104746918913021986185/CavalierConvertibleRearWindowReattachment?feat=directlink

Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Thursday, August 12, 2010 7:41 PM
Hi and Thanks a ton for posting these specific directions.

Could you tell me how it's holding up so far? I want to try this with my daughter's 2004 Beetle convertible, as the dealership wants $2500 for new top when it's just some glue.....
Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Thursday, August 12, 2010 11:52 PM
So far, the glued window has held perfectly for 3 months. There are no signs of fatigue. I have high confidence that it will hold for a long time. FYI: I typically put the roof up and down at least once per day here in northern California.

I don't usually visit this website unless some repair job comes up. But I will definitely post here immediately if the glue-job ever fails. If you don't see a post from me, then assume that my glue job has held since late May 2010.
Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Friday, August 13, 2010 12:06 AM
id rather see pics of the car itself lol



Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Sunday, August 15, 2010 9:06 AM
A+ vert info. ill save it along with your other write ups.





Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Saturday, August 21, 2010 7:28 AM
I am about to try this on an 04 New Beetle Convertible....It is almost completely unattached. I will let you know how it goes. If this works, then I owe you BIG Time, as the VW jerks say the only "fix" is a new top at the cost of $2,500.00.

I will post as to how it goes....
J~
Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Tuesday, August 24, 2010 4:50 PM
Jennifer Lovitt wrote:

I am about to try this on an 04 New Beetle Convertible....It is almost completely unattached. I will let you know how it goes. If this works, then I owe you BIG Time, as the VW jerks say the only "fix" is a new top at the cost of $2,500.00.

I will post as to how it goes....
J~



Post pics so we can actually see how this looks when ur done.


Also Tabs, is there anyway we can possibly get the mods to sticky this as a helpful hint or something???




Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Tuesday, August 24, 2010 6:11 PM
I attempted the top repair on a 2004 New Beetle Convertible with 50,000 miles this weekend on a Saturday. It took me about 2.5 hours start to finish. It is now Tuesday evening and I have put the top up and down several times and have let the top sit out in 90 heat today in direct sun while it was closed to see if the stretching and the heat would affect the repair. It doesn't seem to be budging at all. It is a tight seal and I took the car to the carwash yesterday and put the high pressure water gun on the back glass to make sure....no problems. The back glass was almost totally unglued all the way around. VW said only fix was a new $2,500.00 top. This is my 15 year old's car and we are not going to put that kind of money into a bug since they are prone to break down at any moment anyway. If you are thinking about buying a beetle, my advice is be aware that they have major issues and you will be dropping money on it constantly. Kinda like some girlfriends....very cute and fun, but extremely high-maintenance.

OK. I followed the instructions above except I didn't have to do the interior reattach, and I didn't use the dry erase marker and I probably should have. I thought I had a pretty good template of where to go with the glue by watching the defroster line around the inside of the glass on the outer edge. Also, I am not very good at staying inside the lines, so my fix turned out a little rough around the edges...but all in all it works, it's not nearly as bad as when the glass was falling out, and I saved myself $2,400.00 (everything cost me about $100.00)
RazzMa Tazz.....you are awesome!!! Thanks for posting these thorough instructions. I know if I have to do this again, I will do a better looking job next time...but it looks like it's gonna hold up just fine.

See pictures at:

http://picasaweb.google.com/jenlovitt/BeetleTopFix?feat=directlink
Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Tuesday, August 24, 2010 8:54 PM
Jennifer Lovitt wrote:

I attempted the top repair on a 2004 New Beetle Convertible with 50,000 miles this weekend on a Saturday. It took me about 2.5 hours start to finish. It is now Tuesday evening and I have put the top up and down several times and have let the top sit out in 90 heat today in direct sun while it was closed to see if the stretching and the heat would affect the repair. It doesn't seem to be budging at all. It is a tight seal and I took the car to the carwash yesterday and put the high pressure water gun on the back glass to make sure....no problems. The back glass was almost totally unglued all the way around. VW said only fix was a new $2,500.00 top. This is my 15 year old's car and we are not going to put that kind of money into a bug since they are prone to break down at any moment anyway. If you are thinking about buying a beetle, my advice is be aware that they have major issues and you will be dropping money on it constantly. Kinda like some girlfriends....very cute and fun, but extremely high-maintenance.

OK. I followed the instructions above except I didn't have to do the interior reattach, and I didn't use the dry erase marker and I probably should have. I thought I had a pretty good template of where to go with the glue by watching the defroster line around the inside of the glass on the outer edge. Also, I am not very good at staying inside the lines, so my fix turned out a little rough around the edges...but all in all it works, it's not nearly as bad as when the glass was falling out, and I saved myself $2,400.00 (everything cost me about $100.00)
RazzMa Tazz.....you are awesome!!! Thanks for posting these thorough instructions. I know if I have to do this again, I will do a better looking job next time...but it looks like it's gonna hold up just fine.

See pictures at:

http://picasaweb.google.com/jenlovitt/BeetleTopFix?feat=directlink




First off, HOW THE HELL DID UR 15YR OLD GET THIS CAR??? Hell Im 27 driving a damn 00. Lol. Just kidding.

The second part made me laugh. But all in all, that looks really good! You actually did a good job and it looks really clean. Not one bad thing I can say about it. And I have fixed my share of Vert tops lol. Goodjob!! This post def needs to make a sticky!!




Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Wednesday, August 25, 2010 8:29 AM
Daddy's little girl....seriously, we thought we were buying a safe and reliable vehicle for a new driver, with the plus being that it's fun and cute. Turns out the reason it's so safe is because you can't ever drive it cause it's all broken.... : (
Anyway, at least it won't be leaking on top of it's other issues.

Thanks again! I really appreciate the instructions....My first car was an 86 Chevy Cavalier.
J~
Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Wednesday, August 25, 2010 2:57 PM
Jennifer Lovitt wrote:

Daddy's little girl....seriously, we thought we were buying a safe and reliable vehicle for a new driver, with the plus being that it's fun and cute. Turns out the reason it's so safe is because you can't ever drive it cause it's all broken.... : (
Anyway, at least it won't be leaking on top of it's other issues.

Thanks again! I really appreciate the instructions....My first car was an 86 Chevy Cavalier.
J~


Haha, yeah I have a 6 year old son that I cant say no too so I understand you on that part lol. And I do think its great that a woman did this. U need to tell ur husband that he is a lucky guy. Not many ladies would try this, and you had the guts to do it, and do it good. So goodluck with the bug, and keep us posted if it ever comes apart!





Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Wednesday, August 25, 2010 3:04 PM
turns out i need to do this tomorrow. are there any temp solutions while the 3m stuff comes in?



Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Wednesday, August 25, 2010 3:09 PM
Mike Demo wrote:

turns out i need to do this tomorrow. are there any temp solutions while the 3m stuff comes in?


Duct tape?? Lol. Actually that would prolly be the best thing I can say, thats what held my girls window to the top for a couple weeks while I was in the midst of tearing apart the parts car I had. Works good, if you do it right




Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Thursday, August 26, 2010 9:23 AM
Mike Z A.K.A SNEEZY wrote:

Mike Demo wrote:

turns out i need to do this tomorrow. are there any temp solutions while the 3m stuff comes in?


Duct tape?? Lol.

yep. get the black duct tape and it at least SORT of blends in with the car. at least from farther away. but who cares if its a temp fix. i had to drive around like this for almost 5 months.



Mike Z A.K.A SNEEZY wrote:


Also Tabs, is there anyway we can possibly get the mods to sticky this as a helpful hint or something???

im actually going to include it as a write up for my massive vert info thread that im going to post and i will make sure that is stickied in the exterior forum. basically itll be all of the vert info and write ups that ive done and that i can find from other posters, such as razzmatazz. he also did a nice little write up on how to readjust our DS windows to prevent the leak there too.

razz: ive PMd you about including your info. youve not responded, but since i'll be giving you credit and linking to this post i cant imagine there would be a problem with me using it. although if you read this and have any other info you wanna share, please lemme know.

bug girl: congrats on saving yourself a few grand. makes you feel good, eh? but im with mike on this one. im 29 and driving a 96 vert. < jealous lol




Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Friday, August 27, 2010 7:23 PM
Tabs, Ouch on the top man. I saw your other thread so I know you replaced it. And hell yeah on the write up!! Thanks alot. Since this is my first J Vert, and my girl has a 96 also, im going to need as much help as I can get bc im just not familiar with them at all. Hell, I tackeled replacing the top (one from parts car to my girls) with really no help except the manual YOU posted up. Without that I would have taken stuff apart I didnt even need too. So your the man!!! So far with my girls vert I have replaced the top (got a few pics if you want them of the bolts and such you have to remove and the tack strip and staples also if it would help) and the weather strips except the front one, and all came out pretty good. But yeah, deffinatly keep me posted on that write up, and if I end up doing anything in the newar future that may help with the write up, ill let ya know. Thanks again man!




Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Tuesday, August 31, 2010 1:03 PM
Jennifer: Thanks for taking the time to post results and pictures. It makes me happy to know that my instructions helped somebody else!!!

Tabs: Please feel free to compile/repost my instructions.
Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Sunday, September 26, 2010 10:08 AM
Thanks for the instructions, and I really need to thank Jennifer for her posting.
I am going to try this repair on my girlfriends Beetle as well.

Jennifers posting gave me some hope that it can be done.

My girlfriends beetle is only come unglued on the bottom part of the window so far, I want to get this corrected before it gets to look like the one Jennifer worked on.

I also need to get more clips for the inside. Any insight on this? I emailed www.buggydoctor.com to see if they can get them.

I will let you know how it goes once I start.

Cliff
Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Wednesday, November 17, 2010 10:39 AM
RazzMaTazz wrote:

The Problem:
The rear window in the convertible roof becomes detached from the canvas.

Disclaimer:
I offer these instructions to be helpful, as I have benefited from others who have posted instructions. I don't guarantee the accuracy of these instructions, nor your results should you choose to follow them. Personal or property injury could result from following these instructions. Follow the instructions from the glue and primer vendor. Be careful. And if you don't feel comfortable doing this kind of work, please hire a trained professional to do your repair work.

Time required:
This should take about 2-3 hours of work and at least a day for the glue to cure, depending on temperature and humidity.

Tools & materials required:
* Razor scraper.
* A piece of sandpaper. (Maybe 60-100 grit or so. Used is fine.)
* Utility knife.
* A fine point (preferably) dry-erase marker.
* 9 stick, preferably about 1 thick. (See photos.)
* Packing tape.
* A couple of rags or towels.
* A roll of paper towels.
* 3M Glass Primer- product #08682 (30ml) or #08681 (125ml). 30ml is more than enough. Available online.
* 3M Windo-Weld adhesive 10.5 oz. tube [#08609] . Available online.
* A caulking gun.
* Several sets of latex gloves.
* About 8 full sized towels (like you would use to take a shower), rolled up tight as shown in photos.
* A drop cloth or two (to protect your seats from glue).
* A flashlight, portable electric lantern, or utility light, so that you can see well and work inside the dark window-well.
* Optionally, but I'd recommend, an assistant for about 5 minutes during final gluing and taping stage.

How to fix it:
NOTE:
These instructions (and photos) are based on my 1996 Cavalier convertible coupe but are probably largely applicable to most convertibles of any make or model where the glass is glued to the canvas.

After gluing my window, it felt very secure and I feel confident about it holding long term. However, I am posting these instructions just one week after gluing. I'll try to remember to check-in every few months to let you know if it continues to hold. I'll check-in right away and let you know (by posting below) if it fails.

BACKGROUND:
The bottom edge and the lower half of the side edges of my rear window became detached. I did a lot of research on how to fix it. Many people had posted online that they had tried many different types of glue, but the general consensus was that standard glues (epoxy, gorilla glue, etc.) don't hold in the long run. There are glues that stick to canvas, and there glues that stick to glass, but when gluing glass to canvas you need a specialized primer and glue like the 3M products listed above. (There may be other brands or suitable glues. I don't know.) I could not find the aforementioned 3M adhesive products in auto stores, hardware stores, or retail stores like Walmart, so I had to order them online. They were easy to find online, simply by searching for the product name and number listed above. I got the primer and glue shipped to my house for about $30. The smallest sizes available were at least 10 times more than I needed, and apparently the glue & primer have a very short shelf-life so feel free to get the smallest size available. The instructions for the glue and primer can be found on the 3M website.

STEP BY STEP INSTRUCTIONS:
1) Unlatch the roof, raise it about 6", and prop it up above the windshield with something (like a bunched up towel) as show in the photo. This relieves pressure from the back window.
2) Detach the interior plug for the window defroster if that will be in the way of where you need to glue.
3) Using a razor scraper, scrape all of the old glue from the areas of the window that have come detached.
4) Use sandpaper to rough up the shiny-smooth portions of the canvas (inside & outside pieces) that will attach to the glass. I'm not 100% sure that this step is necessary, but it makes sense since it give the canvas some tooth for the glue to attach.
3) With a damp rag and a dry towel, clean and dry the entire window (on both sides), the surrounding canvas, and the trunk lid. You'll need that all to be cleaned and dry to the you can properly glue the window and tack it into place with tape.
4) Cut a stick to about 8-9 inches. I cut a 45 degree angle on a 1" square bar of scrap wood, 9 inches long. The angled end then slides snugly behind the seatback and props up the back window. Fold over a small piece of packing tape so that it's sticky on both sides, and put it on one end (the blunt end) of the stick. This will keep the stick from sliding across the inside of the window. Then place the stick as shown (behind the center of the seatback) to prop up the window. Be sure to place the rod on the window between the defroster lines so that you don't accidentally take off any defroster paint. (See photos.)
5) Place a drop cloth on the back seat, over the seatback, and if you're really fussy, in the window well, just in case you drip some (black) primer, (black) glue, or drop the magic marker.
6) Now that the window is propped up, test-fit the canvas on both sides, and tape it in place with a few vertically placed strips of packing tape such that there are no wrinkles in the canvas.
7) Mark the window along the canvas line on both sides with a magic marker so that you'll know where to paint the primer.
8) Throw out the old tape that you used for the test fit.
9) Put on some disposable latex gloves. I'd actually recommend putting on double layers of gloves so that, if necessary, you can quickly strip off the top pair if they get messed up while you're gluing. You don't want to get the primer or glue on the canvas, car body, or interior fabric, and I'd say that the most likely way that you'll do that is by touching something with a dirty glove. The workable time of the glue is 15 minutes so you won't have much time to get the job done.
10) Paint the 3M glass primer onto the window (both sides) using the magic marker line as your guide. FYI: The primer is black. The instructions say to use a wool dauber, but I just used a small disposable paint brush. You will need to throw the paint brush away so make sure that it's disposable. Allow the primer to dry at least 10 minutes (per the instructions on the label).
11) Remove the pull-tab from the back of the 3M Windo-Weld glue canister and place it into a caulking gun. FYI: The glue is black.
12) Cut the tip of the 3M Windo-Weld glue canister at an angle as described in the directions for that product.
13) The instructions on the glue say that you just need to lay a bead of glue along the window and then attach the canvas. But I wanted to be certain to get the maximum possible surface contact so I also used my double-glove-covered index finger to rub glue across the entire portion of the exterior side of the window to be glued, as well as rubbing the glue into the entire part of the exterior canvas to be glued. Then I quickly threw away that top layer glove, leaving me with a clean glove beneath. I'm not sure that's all necessary, but that's what I did, and I'd do it again. Don't use so much glue that it will squeeze out onto the window and make a mess. A thin (say 1mm) layer on both the glass and the canvas should do the trick.
14) With clean latex gloves on your hand, attach the exterior-side canvas to the window, and tape it securely into place with some packing tape, as shown in the pictures, at first with some long vertical strips, and then with some horizontal strips running the length of the canvas. Press the canvas and the tape snugly in place, using the primer, glue, as your guideline. The glue is very tacky almost immediately, so the canvas sticks almost immediately, but is workable for a few minute or two. You can do this alone, but you may want to enlist an assistant for the gluing and taping portion. It's pretty hard to rip off new tape with latex gloves. It's OK if some glue squeezes out onto the window because you can scrape it off later. It's not OK if glue gets on the canvas.
15) With clean latex gloves, repeat the gluing and taping process from the previous step for the interior side of the window and the interior canvas.
16) Use some rolled up towels (as shown in the photos) to hold the interior canvas against the window while the glue dries. (Otherwise the portion of the canvas which is not next to the tape, will tend to fall away from the window.
17) Let the glue set according to the curing times listed in the instructions. The curing times vary greatly (from about 1 hour to 100 hours) depending on temperature and humidity. (The more humid, the faster it cures since it's water activated.) I let mine cure for about 3 days in arid California, just to be sure.
18) After the glue dries, remove the tape, the towels, and the prop-up stick.
19) If there is excess glue on the window (which is likely), use a razor scraper or utility knife, running the knife along the edge of the canvas, inside and outside, (perpendicular to the window) to cut a line across the glue, so that when you scrape off the glue, it will peel away from the window at the canvas line. Be careful not to cut the canvas.
20) Using a razor scraper to scrape any excess glue from the window, inside and out. Be careful not to scrape off the defroster paint line on the interior.
21) Remove the towel that is propping up the roof above the windshield, and reattach the defroster plugs if you've disconnected them.
22) Pray that it holds and close the roof. Good luck!

Photos are at the following link:
http://picasaweb.google.com/104746918913021986185/CavalierConvertibleRearWindowReattachment?feat=directlink

Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Wednesday, November 17, 2010 11:17 AM
I want to thank you all for taking the time to help others with similar problem's
I live in florida and have a 96 sebring convertable piece of @#$! this thing leaks everywhere the most recent leak is the back window fell in on the bottom.
Let's say I am officially a duct tape nija, which is a very temporary solution for anyone who is going to attempt it I suggest not to even bother in the summertime because the glue on the tape melts and the weight of the window makes it just fall in.
I live in florida and got lots of practice taping this window.
I went to several junkyards to find a top and believe it or not I found a top that looked brand new with the execption of the back window the outside part on the bottom was unglued( only on the outside),I took the whole frame and all figuring i could bring it to a car top place and they could just re glue it...WRONG They told me i needed the curtain part of the top (back fabric with window already installed) the cost $450.00 I spent $200.00 on the top from the junkyard and a new top is $750.00
The old top is in pretty bad shape so I am going to put the new top on and try to fix it,I figure worst case senerio is it dont work and I have to buy the curtian not the whole top which i would have done, if I knew what I do know.because if this don't work I'm in it for $650,00

After researching this subject for about 3 hours I came across this forum Im going to try the suggested fix above I really hope this works for I have spend way too much time playing with duct tape oh and pvc cement glue which actually did pretty well along with the duct tape.

I'm going to attempt to fix this on thanksgiving so if anyone has any other words of wisdom on fixing this please feel free to let me hear them.I'll take a few pictures for anyone in the future along with some on how to get the whole top off..which was actually pretty easy,I'll be checking back daily for any suggestions..
Thank you all very much I cannot wait for this nightmare to be over........Jeff
Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Wednesday, November 17, 2010 11:32 AM
I have a question I just thought of ...what would be suggestions as far as should I put the top on and then fix it or do ya"ll think it would be easier with the top off the car???
Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Wednesday, November 17, 2010 2:38 PM
I swapped the whole top on my girls 96 cavalier convertible also. Its a really easy job, just getting to everything is a real pain. It will be easier to fix the window issue with it on the car. Just make sure you have enough room with the bottom fabric to be glued onto the window. Funny thing is I acutally owned two sebring convertibles (a 96 and a 98) and my 96 had that issue. I actually used some 3M weatherstip adhesive and lifted the top just enough to reattach the bottom of the valence to the window, glued it, left it like that over night (it was in a garage) and came out the next day and it was good. Only bad part was the top was gold, and the glue was bright yellow. So i took a peice of windshield vinyl sticker, and put it over the glue strip and it covered it up nicely. Goodluck with ur project, and if you have any more questions, feel free to ask!!





Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Friday, November 19, 2010 9:43 AM
STICK-KEY!



Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Friday, November 19, 2010 2:14 PM
95LsCoupe wrote:

STICK-KEY!



X's 100000000000000000




Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Tuesday, March 29, 2011 9:31 PM
FYI: Just checking back in to let you know that my glue job is still holding perfectly after 10 months.
Re: How to repair, reattach convertible rear window
Wednesday, March 30, 2011 3:54 PM
Great! least now we know it works. Turns out the right rear corner of my window is starting to come up. I think it will be time to reglue mine also. also this really needs to be a sticky!!!!!




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