Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide - Second Generation Forum

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Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Sunday, December 09, 2007 8:06 AM
i thought this might be useful to someone here.

taken from http://www.engine-builder.com/


Quote:

Back when GM introduced the "J" cars in 1982, the original 1.8L pushrod motor was not very exciting. Chevy quickly upgraded it to a 2.0L for the Cavalier, but the other divisions (Buick, Olds and Pontiac) had already found something better. They imported the Brazilian-made 1.8L OHC engine that was originally designed for the German Opel and used it in their "J" cars.

There were both turbo and non-turbo versions used from 1982 through Ď86. Then, in 1987 the engine was bored and stroked to make it into a 2.0L. Both turbo and non-turbo versions were used through 1991, but only a non-turbo engine was offered from 1992 through 1994.

Although all the 2.0Ls are basically the same, there are some subtle differences that can cause problems for the rebuilder who doesnít know what to look for. Hereís a closer look at the latest versions in this family of engines:

BLOCKS
1987-í91: All of these blocks have the same casting number (90209802) even though there are two versions ó one with a six-bolt bellhousing for the automatic transmission, and one with a seven-bolt housing for the manual transmission.

Note: The seven-bolt block can be used with an automatic, but the six-bolt canít be used with a stick.

All these engines have a hole drilled in the left side, toward the front of the block, just above the pan rail, with a long, brass cup plug that sticks into the crankcase. Itís used for a sensor that picks up a signal from the two steel pins in the front counter weight and indexes the computer for the sequential fuel injection thatís used on the turbo motors.

1992-í94: This block is the same as the earlier one and will have either the old casting number (90209802) or a new one (90400045). There are two differences, though, beginning in Ď92:

ēThe hole for the brass plug wasnít needed in Ď92, so itís no longer drilled. See photo.

ēThere is a boss on the left side toward the front of the block, and about half way up on the side is drilled all the way into the crankcase with a small, threaded hole beside it. Although the boss has always been there, it wasnít drilled until Ď92. Itís needed for an additional sensor that provides data to the computer for both the direct ignition (DIS) and the sequential fuel injection (SEFI). See photo.

CRANKS
1987-í91: The early crank had either a 9028036 or a 90280399 casting number. There are two steel pins sticking out from the front counterweight that are used to index the computer for SEFI on the turbos, but they arenít needed for the naturally-aspirated engines. See photo.

1992-í94: The crank was changed in Ď92 to accommodate a reluctor wheel. The face of the front counter weight was machined, and three countersunk holes were drilled and tapped so the wheel could be bolted onto the crank. See photo. If the reluctor wheel is damaged in any way, it must be replaced with a new one from GM (p/n 90265094) at a cost of about $40.

RODS
All the rods are interchangeable in sets. There arenít any casting numbers, but there is one hump on the early (1987-í91) rod and two humps on the later (Ď92-í94) ones. There is a slight difference in weight, but GM lists only one replacement rod for all the 2.0Ls, so itís safe to use them in sets, and it should even be okay to use them interchangeably.

HEADS
1987-í91: The original 2.0L head had a 90209851 casting number. It has a "modified, heart-shaped chamber."

1992-í94: The late model 2.0L head has more of an oblong, "D" shaped chamber that increased the compression ratio while improving quench and squish when used with the revised piston. There are two castings; the engines originally came with a 90400095, but the replacement head is a 90209896.

The later service head has a large, threaded boss surrounding each spark plug, probably for a threaded heat shield that is used to protect the plug wires in some other application. The threads arenít needed for domestic engines, but they donít create problems either, so GM uses this fits-all head for service parts.

CAMS
1987-í91: The 2.0L originally came with two different cams. The naturally aspirated engines used a p/n 94658951 with a 179į/192į duration. The turbo motors used a p/n 94658949 that had a 189į/189į duration.

1992-í94: The late 2.0L was available only as a naturally aspirated engine, but it used the "turbo" cam, p/n 94658949 (which is a Wolverine CS866 or a Melling SPC-19), along with the higher compression ratio to improve performance.

PISTONS
1987-í91: The original piston had a dished top, just like the 231 Buick. It was made by Metal Leve. See photo.

1992-í94: The late piston has a smaller diameter cup that is offset to one side so it lines up with the combustion chamber. It has a Metal Leve casting number (90500879) on the inside of the skirt. Using the early piston in the late engineor the late one in the early engine will cause problems.

RINGS
Both the early and late 2.0L engines share a common ring set with a 1.50 mm top ring, a 1.50 mm second ring and a 3.0 mm oil ring.

OIL PUMPS
All 2.0L engines share a common oil pump, but itís not the same one that was used on the l.8L; itís a GM p/n 94657310.

FRONT COVERS
GM has used three different front covers for the timing belt, including one that was carried over from the 1.8L that is not shown in the GM parts book.

ēSome of the early 1987 engines used the carryover 1.8L design with the one-piece plastic cover that bolted on and covered up the front of the engine.

ēAll late Ď87s and all Ď88s used a four-piece plastic cover that enclosed the belt. Two of these pieces have to be installed before the timing belt goes on, so the rebuilder has to put them on the long block. They are available from GM as p/n 90264873 and 90281810.

ēThe latest version was used from Ď89 through Ď94. It has a metal backing plate that goes on the engine before the gears and belt are installed. Then, a one-piece plastic cover is installed over the belt. The backing plate is p/n 10068587.

REBUILDING TIPS
ēThe 2.0L heads donít seem to crack nearly as often as the 1.8L heads did, but itís still wise to inspect them carefully, especially between the seats. The valve stems are 7.0 mm, so it takes special tooling to do the guides.

ēThe pistons are fitted very tightly in the bore. The OEM specification calls for .0004" to .0012" on the naturally aspirated engine and a little more on the turbo. The pistons have a very short skirt, so they will rattle if they have too much clearance. Be sure to doublecheck the clearance required for the pistons you buy and stay within the specified tolerances to avoid noise problems.

ēUse new cams for all these engines for three very important reasons:

1) These cams are very difficult to clean because itís almost impossible to remove the hardened steel balls from the oil passage that is drilled through the center of the cam.

2) These cams have an involute on the flank that is hard to duplicate with many cam grinders. If itís not right, the lifters will pump up and hold the valves open.

3) These engines tend to be hard on cams during the initial start-up. Most aftermarket cams are made of a better material to help solve this problem, so buying a new cam is cheap insurance on a comeback.

CONCLUSION
Thatís the story of the GM 2.0L engine family. As you can see, itís pretty straightforward as long as you build the right combination, watch the piston clearance and use a new camshaft. There are lots of "J" cars still out there, so plan on rebuilding a few in the years to come. The rebuild time versus profit margin makes these engines a fairly good proposition.















NO SIG FOR YOU!

Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Monday, December 10, 2007 3:20 PM
Thats good stuff. Its going in the FAQ as soon as I get a chance. Its similar to the 2.2 article.




Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Tuesday, December 11, 2007 4:24 AM
I always love these articles. This one is as good as any others (I have a current one here detailing the Chrysler 2.4 engines) but I want to point out an error.

Quote:

All these engines have a hole drilled in the left side, toward the front of the block, just above the pan rail, with a long, brass cup plug that sticks into the crankcase. Itís used for a sensor that picks up a signal from the two steel pins in the front counter weight and indexes the computer for the sequential fuel injection thatís used on the turbo motors.


Some of this is incorrect. In Europe this sensor may be used for EFI, but in the US it is not used in the turbo vehicles. US built turbo cars use a distributor to send a reference pulse to the ecm. Since these vehicles do not use sequential fuel injection, there is no sequencing necessary. The injectors are fired in alternating banks of 2 injectors with every other reference pulse. Even if the engines were sequential, the synch signal would have to be timed from the camshaft. So, on US built turbo cars, this hole is plugged and no sensor is present.

Also, the turbo blocks have a boss drilled for an oil return from the turbo. The boss has been present on all engines I've looked at but it's only been drilled on turbo specific engines.

Now if only the article had gone on to cover the DOHC versions I'd really be thrilled!

-->Slow
Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Thursday, December 27, 2007 11:56 AM
OK Im new here and have a question about the 6 bolt and 7 bolt bellhousing ... I am replacing a 2.0 in a 89 gt convert. 5 speed. The motor I picked up is from a auto trans. My question is why will the 6 bolt block bolt up to the 5 speed as mentioned above??? It looks like it would . Looks to me like the 7 bolt block would not bolt to the auto trans as the 7th hole is in the way. I just dont wanna waste time and $'s on the wrong block.
Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Thursday, February 14, 2008 11:31 PM
Ben: thanks for the info --- I STILL have that bottle of Captain Morgan's Silver waiting for you =P

James: do you have an account set up with the new software to upload to the FAQ? i have two other web-projects going on right now (the plus side is i'm learning alot) so i havent had a chance to mess with jbodysource.org but i will come back to it in a few months... i have a ton of new ideas and now i know how to implement them... (i know the site is 3 years old and i havent gotten too far with it)... anyway I wanted to come out camping with you guys, but the owner of the shop fell off a ladder and broke both of his arms so i couldnt get off work (since we had the car show the week after) ... but you and me need to catch up and plan out what we wanna do with this site to make it reach its potential...



Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Saturday, February 16, 2008 6:01 AM
Email me the details- james.w.cahill@us.army.mil




Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Tuesday, February 19, 2008 2:30 AM
James: make sure your spam filters have @speedlinemotorsports.org allowed... i'll be e-mailing you tomorrow msot likely. =)



Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Friday, February 22, 2008 12:07 AM
James: Email sent...

Tabs and Fallen Angel have joined the staff too...



Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Sunday, February 24, 2008 6:39 PM
Thats great stuff, could of used it many years ago when I still had the 2.0 in the Z24Door lol








Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Saturday, March 01, 2008 7:52 AM
^^ You have a different 2.0 than what the article is about.

-->Slow
Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Wednesday, March 19, 2008 6:57 PM
Yeah I just noticed now since I actually read a few sentences haha. But yeah there was a performance build book for the 2.0 OHV as well. Katech engines back in the day had them in a few race cars. There is also a section of parts in the '90 GMPP catalogue






Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Sunday, June 29, 2008 9:53 PM
"Note: The seven-bolt block can be used with an automatic, but the six-bolt canít be used with a stick."


Does that apply to the 92-94 blocks? I take it the answer is NO since people are doin auto to manual conversions....




89 355 s10 blazer
94 sunbird, 2.0 turbo 5spd getrag swap
Turbonetics turbo, intercooler, E85 20psi
Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Monday, June 30, 2008 11:51 AM
Luis wrote:

Thats great stuff, could of used it many years ago when I still had the 2.0 in the Z24Door lol




where is this type of intake aquired from? I've seen it a few times?



Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Sunday, September 29, 2013 10:57 PM
Could we have a sticky for the performance builder's guide for this engine? I'm having trouble finding it & I know I've seen it here before.


Go beyond the "bolt-on".
Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Monday, September 30, 2013 5:40 AM
Here's a link to the Engine Builder Article with pictures http://www.enginebuildermag.com/Article/2431/updating_the_gm_20l_engine.aspx






Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Monday, September 30, 2013 5:43 AM
Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Friday, November 22, 2013 5:11 PM
Was working .....no longer is ??????????????

Doug in P.R.


92 Pontiac Sunbird LE, 2.0, AT, Red / Black with Grey 143 K miles.Slowly getting back to a halfway decent car............in Salinas, Puerto Rico!




Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Monday, November 25, 2013 4:56 AM
Guessing they did a website update. This is the only one left Rebuilding the Chevy 2.2L Engine . Unfortunately I didn't get around to saving the other one to my hd.








Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Tuesday, November 26, 2013 5:24 PM
I'm pretty sure I have them both. PM me if you want them.



Re: Updating the GM 2.0L Engine: rebuilder's guide
Thursday, November 28, 2013 8:26 AM
Just for future reference-

I have in PDF form- 2.0OHC builder's guide, 2.2OHV builder's guide, 2.2 Growing pains article (this and the 2.2 builder's guide are essentially the same), and the 2.0OHV build up article.

Feel free to ask for them from me.
.



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