Alignment Specs... - Suspension and Brake Forum

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Alignment Specs...
Thursday, November 21, 2013 10:52 AM
Going to be doing my alignment tommorow and want to know the kind of specs I should tell them to aim for.

I was thinking about -1.5* camber

But when it comes to toe I was reading 1.5* toe-in is also desirable??

Edited 1 time(s). Last edited Thursday, November 21, 2013 12:13 PM

Re: Alignment Specs...
Thursday, November 21, 2013 1:44 PM



Re: Alignment Specs...
Thursday, November 21, 2013 2:31 PM
Why does it say except Mexico? lol



"In Oldskool we trust"
Re: Alignment Specs...
Thursday, November 21, 2013 3:00 PM
Where the vehicle was built


Re: Alignment Specs...
Thursday, November 21, 2013 3:11 PM
Im not looking for stock specs though...

I read that toeing in will make the cars steering feel more stable and wont wander as easy on road wells.
Re: Alignment Specs...
Thursday, November 21, 2013 7:26 PM
Toe will wear tires more quickly than camber.

What are you using the car for? Autox? Daily driver?

If dding the car I'd go mild on the camber and leave the toe unchanged.

If autoxing, you can go a bit more aggressive on camber and most will run minimal toe in the rear to help with rotation. Like 1-2 tenths of a degree.

Keep in mind you'll need shims in the rear for toe/camber changes.



Re: Alignment Specs...
Wednesday, November 27, 2013 6:46 PM
For my car, which is mainly set up for drag racing and some spirited cornering, I went with -.5 degree camber and toe on the negative side of spec limits. The toe in will allow for better turn in and feel going down the road, as friction from the road tends to force the wheels out away from each other. (Think of the wheels on a shopping cart) Dead-on zeroed out toe specs will generally make a car darty and follow grooves and imperfections in the road. Dead on zero camber will make the car wallow and under steer in corners as the weight shifts in the corners lifting the tire and reducing the contact patch area of the tire. Also as the car lifts the front end from a launch, the front suspension lifts up and brings camber out towards positive. So setting camber to the negative is allowing for the weight shift and bringing the camber closer to zero on a corner or during launch, therefore making a larger contact patch area for the tire.

For autocross or cars that will be seeing heavy cornering, more negative camber is generally desirable. For drag racing, depending on launch methods and suspension setup, less camber is usually the norm, but still set towards the negative. Hope this helps.




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