Decent FAQ for beginners - Nitrous Oxide Forum

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Decent FAQ for beginners
Monday, April 04, 2005 7:18 AM
OKay guys I made this post a long while ago. I just noticed in this forum the same questions are asked over and over and over


so if you have any general questions read this (esp. the tech part) --- I know the faq is bias to NX because it is their faq and some of the info is self explanatory but there is some good info in there for people who are thinking of going with nitrous but know little to nothing about it

*******beginners please read before you post any questions about nitrous**************


I just was browsing around and found this FAQ on the NX website. It answers some questions i see around here regularly

yeah they do some selling in thier faq but the tech portion (bottom would be something some people might want to read





Most Commonly Asked Questions -

Q. How does nitrous oxide create more horsepower?
A. Nitrous oxide provides the oxygen that allows an engine to burn more fuel, more burned fuel equals more power.


Q. What is the difference between a wet and a dry system?
A. A "Wet" system introduces a homogenous mixture of nitrous and atomized fuel into the incoming air stream, thus providing a perfect air/fuel ratio for each.


Q. Can I still run my car all-motor with nitrous installed?
A. Of course, the nitrous system only affects performance when it is being used.


Q. How can nitrous blow my engine up?
A. Nitrous in and of itself cannot "blowup" an engine. Nitrous kits of poor design, poor quality, and improper air/fuel ratios damage engines.


Q. What is nitrous backfire?
A. Nitrous backfires can be caused by two situations. 1. A nitrous system that is two rich or a system that atomizes the fuel poorly, thus causing pooling or puddling of fuel in the intake manifold. 2. A system that is operated too lean.


Q. What is meant by 30, 50, 100, 150, and 200 shots?
A. "Shot" is commonly used slang in the nitrous community to refer to the amount of horsepower increase provided by the nitrous system.


Q. How long can I squeeze nitrous in my engine?
A. With an NX system the only limitation is the capacity of the N2O bottle or the RPM limit of the engine.


Q. When is the best time to use nitrous?
A. When you want to go fast.


Q. How can a nitrous system be activated (a "happy button," automatically, or what)?
A. All NX systems come standard with wide-open throttle switches, however we offer an electronic TPS switch as well as a push button.


Q. What is the safest way to configure nitrous activation?
A. The only safe way is to use a wide open throttle switch, however you may configure any number of ways to "trip" the system but all must be used in conjunction with some type of wide open throttle switch.


Q. Is a bottle heater good?
A. A quality bottle heater is essential to proper nitrous system performance.


Q. Can I vary the amount of nitrous injected when I want?
A. Yes, by utilizing NX's digital progressive controller, the "Maximizer". This devise allows the user to precisely control the amount of nitrous delivered to his engine from the comfort of the drivers seat.


Q. Can I install a nitrous system on my car if there is no kit available?
A. NX has a system for every car manufactured in the world today.


Q. How much of a horsepower increase can I expect from a nitrous system?
A. All NX systems make within 2% of their claimed horsepower, if you jet the system for 50 horsepower then you can expect no less than 49 horsepower, but usually a few more than the rated amount.


Q. How long will a bottle of nitrous last?
A. That depends on the level of power being produced. The formula for calculating your nitrous usage is: 0.8 lbs N2O X 10 seconds = 100 horsepower. I.E. If your system is jetted for 100 horsepower it will use 0.8 lbs of nitrous for every 10 seconds of usage.


Q. How much does it cost to get nitrous refills?
A. The cost of nitrous oxide varies with the region of the country, however a general estimate would be between $3.50-5.00 per pound.


Q. Are there nitrous systems available for late model imports?
A. NX makes a system for every car manufactured today.


Q. What comes with a nitrous kit?
A. Most NX systems come complete with a 10 lb nitrous bottle, stainless steel bottle brackets, 16 ft aircraft style supply line, N2O filter, lifetime warranty nitrous and fuel solenoids with mounts, all standard jet settings, an NX patented Shark nozzle (nozzles), or a patented carbureted plate, wide open throttle switch, a complete installation pack that includes all bolts, nuts, washers, wire, wire terminals, lighted arming switch, and complete instructions with pictures.


Q. Will I need anything else to install the kit properly?

A. To complete the installation a Gen-X package should be ordered with the system. This includes the bottle heater, liquid filled nitrous pressure gauge, low fuel pressure safety switch, and a external bottle vent fitting and plumbing kit.


Q. Can I hide my nitrous system from a novice tuner?
A. Yes, it is quite easy to hide an NX system from the casual observer.


Q. Can I use nitrous on my turbo or supercharged vehicle?
A. Yes, NX specializes in turbo-supercharged nitrous applications.


Q. What are some general rules for creating the most horsepower without damaging anything?
A. Generally speaking the amount of power that can be created with nitrous is almost limitless. To avoid a catastrophe, the internal components of the engine must match the amount of power that is going to be generated. The use of proper air/fuel ratios is essential and the quality of the nitrous system is paramount.


Q. Is a nitrous system worth the money (horsepower per dollar wise)?
A. No other devise in the world offers such a bargain as nitrous oxide.


Q. Why doesn't everyone use nitrous?
A. Nitrous is not for everyone, some people prefer turbos, some like blowers, and others feel it is cheating to use nitrous.


Q. Why does nitrous have such a scary reputation?
A. There has been some very shoddy nitrous "kits" sold to unsuspecting customers over the last 20 years; this along with the abuse nitrous has suffered from "idiots" who damage their own engines.


back to top


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Technical Questions -
Q. How does a nitrous system operate on a fuel-injected vehicle?
A. The NX system is a complete stand-alone air/fuel delivery system that augments the standard factory EFI unit. It provides additional fuel and oxygen to the cylinders via the patented "Shark" nozzle mounted in the intake tract to provide additional horsepower.


Q. How does a nitrous system operate on a carbureted vehicle?
A. The most common method of boosting power on carbureted applications is the use of a "plate" sandwiched between the carb and the intake manifold. This plate contains orificed tubes that deliver the nitrous/fuel mixture in precise ratios.


Q. How easy is it to install a basic wet nitrous system?
A. The NX "Stage One" EFI System is very straightforward. It requires no engine disassembly, no fuel system modifications or timing retards. Simply install the "Shark" nozzle in the intake tract approximately 2-6 inches in front of the throttle body and connect the fuel solenoid to the high-pressure side of the injection rail and your ready to go.


Q. Purge valves look cool, should I get one for my nitrous vehicle?
A. A purge valve is a valuable tool for increased nitrous performance. It allows the user to "Purge" all gaseous nitrous from the bottle supply line prior to using the system. This allows for a harder "Hit" from the system thus increasing performance.


Q. What safety features come with a nitrous system?
A. There are several safety related devises that can be used with a modern nitrous system. The first, and most important is the wide-open throttle switch. This prevents the user from accidentally engaging the system. A special high flow nitrous filter is furnished with every NX street system. All hoses are aircraft quality stainless steel braided, Teflon. All NX systems come with the highest quality, made in the USA, stainless steel solenoids.


Q. How does the solenoid know when to open and release the nitrous oxide?
A. All NX systems are furnished with Wide Open Throttle switches. This switch signals the solenoids to open when the motor reaches wide-open throttle.


Q. What are the differences between a dry nozzle and a wet nozzle?
A. The "dry" system uses the factory fuel injection to enrich the nitrous introduced into the engine. The flaw with this technology is that no matter how much nitrous arrives at a certain intake port it always gets the same preset amount of fuel, or if a fuel injector becomes clogged engine damage will result. The "Wet" technology introduces a precise amount of fuel and nitrous through a high tech mixing nozzle that atomizes the fuel to microscopic proportions. This allows every cylinder to receive a precise, homogenous mixture of fuel and nitrous, thus insuring a safe, powerful increase.


Q. What is nitrous backfire?
A. Nitrous backfires can be caused by two situations. 1. A nitrous system that is two rich or a system that atomizes the fuel poorly, thus causing pooling or puddling of fuel in the intake manifold. 2. A system that is operated too lean.


Q. Should I use an aftermarket ignition with nitrous?
A. All NX Street or Stage One systems are designed to operate with stock ignition; however any upgrade in the stock ignition is a definite plus.


Q. Should I change my ignition system in any way (timing, plugs, etc.)?
A. All NX Stage One or Street systems are designed to operate with no timing retard. Spark plugs should be changed to non-platinum style, 1 to 2 steps colder than stock.


Q. Will a bigger bottle give you more horsepower?
A. No; however a larger capacity bottle will provide a more stable bottle pressure resulting in a lower E.T. and a higher M.P.H.


Q. What is the difference between a 1 stage and a 2 stage system?
A. A single stage system refers to one single nitrous system; a 2 stage or dual stage incorporates two nitrous systems on one application. This allows a car to launch with the maximum horsepower possible, with the traction available, then add more power down track as the car can handle it.


Q. Why does my engine need more fuel while on the bottle?
A. The fuel, or gasoline, is the source of the additional horsepower. The nitrous' job is to provide the oxygen to allow the fuel to be burned.


Q. How can my engine get more fuel while on the bottle?
A. All NX systems add additional fuel during nitrous usage by injecting it directly with the nitrous through their patented "Shark" nozzle. This method assures 100% atomization of the fuel and accurate air/fuel ratios.


Q. What is the safest way to configure nitrous activation?
A. The only safe way is to use a wide open throttle switch, however you may configure any number of ways to "trip" the system but all must be used in conjunction with some type of wide open throttle switch.


Q. Is a bottle heater good?
A. A quality bottle heater is essential to proper nitrous system performance.


Q. How much pressure should be in my bottle?
A. All NX systems are designed to operate between 900-1050 PSI.


Q. What accessories are available for a nitrous system?
A. NX has over one hundred accessory part numbers, ranging from digital progressive controllers to space age bottle insulating jackets.


Q. Can I vary the amount of nitrous injected when I want?
A. Yes, by utilizing NX's digital progressive controller, the "Maximizer". This devise allows the user to precisely control the amount of nitrous delivered to his engine from the comfort of the drivers seat.


Q. Can I install a nitrous system on my car if there is no kit available?
A. NX has a system for every car manufactured in the world today.


Q. Do you have an installation manual online so I can see if I want to install a kit on my car?
A. Yes.


Q. How does a nitrous system know when I'm at wide-open throttle?
A. All NX systems are equipped with wide-open throttle micro switches, or an optional electronic TPS switch is available.


Q. How much of a horsepower increase can I expect from a nitrous system?
A. All NX systems make within 2% of their claimed horsepower, if you jet the system for 50 horsepower then you can expect no less than 49 horsepower, but usually a few more than the rated amount.


Q. Are there any dangers or things to stay away from while using nitrous?
A. Of course, NX recommends that no more than an additional 20 horsepower per cylinder be used on a stock engine, with a stock fuel pump. Always be sure you are using clean, uncontaminated nitrous. Also, be sure you have the highest octane fuel available, I.E. 93 octane premium for, stock compression, street cars and the highest motor octane fuel available for competition type vehicles.


Q. Is there a trade off for engine reliability and power produced with nitrous?
A. When used according to factory recommendations, shortened engine life should not be a concern.


Q. How long will a bottle of nitrous last?
A. That depends on the level of power being produced. The formula for calculating your nitrous usage is: .8 lbs N2O X 10 seconds = 100 horsepower. I.E. If your system is jetted for 100 horsepower it will use .8 lbs of nitrous for every 10 seconds of usage.


A. The cost of nitrous oxide varies with the region of the country, however a general estimate would be between $3.50-5.00 per pound.


Q. Can you feed an engine too much nitrous even if you keep the air/fuel ratio the same?
A. Yes, if the mechanical limits of the engine are exceeded catastrophic engine failure will result.


Q. Are there nitrous systems available for late model imports?
A. NX makes a system for every car manufactured today.


Q. What comes with a nitrous kit?
A. Most NX systems come complete with a 10 lb nitrous bottle, stainless steel bottle brackets, 16 ft aircraft style supply line, N2O filter, lifetime warranty nitrous and fuel solenoids with mounts, all standard jet settings, an NX patented Shark nozzle (nozzles), or a patented carbureted plate, wide open throttle switch, a complete installation pack that includes all bolts, nuts, washers, wire, wire terminals, lighted arming switch, and complete instructions with pictures.


Q. Will I need anything else to install the kit properly?
A. To complete the installation a Gen-X package should be ordered with the system. This includes the bottle heater, liquid filled nitrous pressure gauge, low fuel pressure safety switch, and a external bottle vent fitting and plumbing kit.


Q. Can I hide my nitrous system from a novice tuner?
A. Yes, it is quite easy to hide an NX system from the casual observer.


Q. Can I use a nitrous kit on an automatic?
A. Yes, the preferred application, for nitrous, is an automatic transmission equipped vehicle.


Q. Can you powerbrake an automatic with nitrous without it blowing up?
A. The answer is a qualified, yes. If your brakes can hold your engine, at full throttle, with the nitrous on, the answer is yes, but it is doubtful this would be possible.


Q. Can a nitrous system be set up to shut down once the brake is depressed?
A. Yes, if the user wires his system with a double throw-double pole relay placed between the arming switch and the wide open throttle switch that is activated when the brakes are applied.


Q. Can nitrous systems be used with aftermarket chips or ECU's?
A. Yes, however close attention must be paid to excessive timing advance that could cause detonation.


Q. Are drag racing launch techniques any different with nitrous for AT or MT's?
A. Depending on the traction available the launch techniques are the same, however with the increased torque and horsepower generated by nitrous usage, sometimes is necessary to delay the nitrous onset for a brief period.


Q. How high must the RPM's before activating nitrous?
A. The RPM level is not as important as is the motors ability to rev freely when the nitrous is engaged, I.E. If the vehicle is in low gear, nitrous can be engaged at any time, but if the vehicle is in a higher gear moving at a slow speed when the nitrous is engaged the engine will detonate and damage will occur.


Q. Does nitrous increase cylinder temperatures and combustion chamber pressure?
A. No, cylinder temperatures should stay the same when the correct nitrous air/fuel ratio is used. Yes, increased cylinder pressure equals increased horsepower.


Q. Can I use nitrous on my high compression engine?
A. Yes, but the proper octane fuel must be used to prevent detonation.


Q. Can I use nitrous on my turbo or supercharged vehicle?
A. Yes, NX specializes in turbo-supercharged nitrous applications.


Q. What are some general rules for creating the most horsepower without damaging anything?
A. Generally speaking the amount of power that can be created with nitrous is almost limitless. To avoid a catastrophe, the internal components of the engine must match the amount of power that is going to be generated. The use of proper air/fuel ratios is essential and the quality of the nitrous system is paramount.


Q. What pressure should my nitrous bottle be at?
A. All NX systems are calibrated to operate at 900-1050 PSI.


Q. What if the pressure is too high, should I cool it?
A. If the bottle pressure is in excess of 1100 PSI the bottle should be cooled using a wet towel or chamois.


Q. Is there any harm that can be done to my engine if I use nitrous while the bottle pressure is too high?
A. Yes, the nitrous system will run "lean" if the nitrous pressure is high beyond specification. This could cause severe engine damage.


Q. Where should I run the main nitrous feed line?
A. The feed line can be run either under the car of through the passenger compartment. Care should be taken to route the line away from any voltage points or moving suspension parts.


Q. Where should I install my bottle?
A. The ideal place to mount the bottle is in the trunk; however if your car is a hatchback it is permissible to mount it in the passenger compartment if an external pressure relief vent is properly installed on the bottle.


Q. What if my bottle leaks while I'm driving, could I get busted for OWI?
A. To become, "intoxicated", the nitrous leak would have to be severe and noticeable. No excuses to be found here!


Q. Is a nitrous system worth the money (horsepower per dollar wise)?
A. No other devise in the world offers such a bargain as nitrous oxide.


Q. Why doesn't everyone use nitrous?
A. Nitrous is not for everyone, some people prefer turbos, some like blowers, and others feel it is cheating to use nitrous.


Q. Why does nitrous have such a scary reputation?
A. There has been some very shoddy nitrous "kits" sold to unsuspecting customers over the last 20 years; this along with the abuse nitrous has suffered from "idiots" who damage their own engines.





Re: Decent FAQ for beginners
Monday, April 04, 2005 8:35 AM
Sticky!!!!!!!!!!!!



Re: Decent FAQ for beginners
Monday, April 04, 2005 11:46 AM
Very Sticky!!!!



'99 2200 LS CX1 Sport
Re: Decent FAQ for beginners
Monday, April 04, 2005 12:52 PM
sticky icky icky!
Re: Decent FAQ for beginners
Monday, April 04, 2005 4:25 PM
^^^^^^^^^^ agreed



Re: Decent FAQ for beginners
Tuesday, April 05, 2005 11:57 AM
STICKY.!!

Thanks a ton..prolly will help out alot. I know it helped me




Re: Decent FAQ for beginners
Tuesday, April 05, 2005 6:19 PM
Volumeking, you got nitrous now?
that would make you like what the 3rd member of MN J-BO to have N2O?



'99 2200 LS CX1 Sport
Re: Decent FAQ for beginners
Tuesday, April 05, 2005 9:04 PM
make this a sticky, I COMMAND IT!!!!






racing a ford is like racing a fat kid.
Re: Decent FAQ for beginners
Wednesday, April 06, 2005 9:55 PM
THATS RIGHT!

They just need a little tough love.


racing a ford is like racing a fat kid.
Re: Decent FAQ for beginners
Friday, April 08, 2005 7:21 AM
finally a good n2o sticky!


damn right that says premium biatch!
Re: Decent FAQ for beginners
Tuesday, May 24, 2005 12:01 PM
Tought that this would be a nice addition



How Does Nitrous Oxide Work?

There are three points. First, nitrous oxide is comprised of 2 parts nitrogen and one part oxygen (36% oxygen by weight). *This is why you will commonly see it referred to as N2O when typed out on message boards and the like* When the nitrous oxide is heated to approximately 572oF (on compression stroke), it breaks down and release extra oxygen, However, it is not this oxygen alone which creates additional power, but the ability of this oxygen to burn more fuel. By burning more fuel, higher cylinder pressures are created and this is where most of the additional power is realized. Secondly, as pressurized nitrous oxide is injected into the intake manifold, it changes from a liquid to a gas (boils). This boiling affect reduces the temperature of the nitrous to a minus .127 Degrees F. This "cooling affect" in turn significantly reduces intake charge temperatures by approximately 60-75 Degrees F. This also helps create additional power. A general rule of thumb: For every 10 Degrees F. reduction in intake charge temperature, a 1% increase in power will be realized. Example: A 350 HP engine with an intake temperature drop of 70 Degrees F, would gain approximately 25 HP on the cooling affect alone. The third point, the nitrogen that was also released during the compression stroke performs an important role. Nitrogen acts to "buff or dampen" the increased cylinder pressures leading to a controlled combustion process. *This is not to be mistaken with bottle pressure (measured in PSi) Which I will further explain later if it is not covered here*


Why Nitrous?

Nitrous oxide injection has become a very popular option for today's performance enthusiast for several reasons:

Nitrous offers you more performance per dollar spent, than any other performance modification.
Nitrous installations are relatively easy to accomplish.
Since Nitrous is used only when needed, it offers you the advantages of complete driveability and normal gas mileage while not "on the button."
Systems available for virtually any power need from 25 HP to over 500 extra HP.
One of the few performance options available for today's computer controlled, fuel injected engines.
Systems can easily be removed or transferred to another vehicle.
*Nitrous is also considered "instant torque" so to speak. When you're "on the button" the throttle response will be immediate as opposed to the lag one might encounter in turbo-charged setups*



Q: Will Nitrous affect engine reliability?

A: The key is choosing the correct H.P. for a given application. *Note that jet sizes (fuel and n2o) will vary depending on your application / car. Although some applications tend to be capable of holding a larger shot, some are not and you should always do your research prior to selecting this. See the following question for more info.* A kit that uses the correct factory calibration does not usually cause increased wear. As the energy released in the cylinder increases so do the loads on the variuos components that must handle them. If the load increases exceed the ability of the component to handle them, added wear takes place. NOS kits are designed for use on demand and only at wide open throttle. Nitrous can be extremeny advantageous i that it is only used when you want it, not all the time. All NOS kits are designed for maximum power with reliability for a given application.


Q: Can I simply bolt a nitrous kit onto my stock engine?

A: Yes, NOS/NX/ZEX/Venom manufacture systems for virtually any stock engine application. The key is to choose the correct kit for a given application; i.e., 4 cyl. engines normally allow an extra 40-60 HP*(and sometimes upto 75-100)*, 6 cyl. engines usually work great between 75-100 extra HP, small block V8's (302/350/400cid) can typically accept up to 140 extra HP, and big block V8's (427/454) might accept from 125-200 extra HP. These suggested ranges provide maximum reliability from most stock engines using cast pistons and cast crank with few or no engine modifications. *Note that when we refer to a 50 shot, or 60 shot, this is a general measurement for the amount of Wheel Horsepower (WHP) the shot will yield. In most cases, it is safe to assume that a 50 shot will yield 50WHP, a 60 shot will yield 60WHP and so on and so forth. However, in some applications (for example turbo charged applications that are ALSO running n2o) these figures may vary with the shot generally yielding more WHP than noted*


Q: What are some of the general rules for even higher H.P. gains?

A: Generally, forged aluminum pistons are one of the best modifications you can make. Retard ignition timing by 4-8 degrees (1 to 1 degrees timing retard per 50 H.P. gain). In many cases a higher flowing fuel pump may be necessary. Higher octane (100+) racing type fuel may be required as well as spark plugs 1 to 2 heat ranges colder than normal with gaps closed to .025"-.030". *It is important to note that the best plugs said to be used for n2o applications are copper plugs. Iridium and others tend not to mix well with nitrous*For gains over 250 H.P., other important modifications could be necessary in addition to those mentioned above. These special modifications may include a forged crankshaft, a high quality race type connecting rod, a high output fuel pump dedicated to feeding the additional fuel demands of the nitrous system, and a racing fuel with high specific gravity and an octane rating of 110 or more. *Please don't ever underestimate the importance of fuel when it relates to any forced induction application. A GOOD investment would also be to attain an air fuel gauge (widebands being the absolute best) so that you may monitor whether or not your car is leaning out. Some more advanced nitrous systems (like the VENOM kit) will automatically shut off the n2o when it reads you are running lean. (This is because this system usually taps into your O2 sensor).*


Q: How much performance improvement can I expect with a nitrous system?

A: For many applications an improvement from 1 to 3 full seconds and 10 to 15 MPH in the quarter mile can be expected. Factors such as engine size, tires, jetting, gearing, etc. will effect the final results. *It is a general rule of thumb, as aforementioned, that the WHP gained will be equivalent to that of the size of "shot" of nitrous that you are using. Please refer to my other comments above*


Q: How long will the bottle last?

A: This largely depends on the type of nitrous kit and jetting used. For example, a 125 HP Power Shot kit with a standard 10 lb. capacity bottle will usually offer up to 7 to 10 full quarter-mile passes. For power levels of 250 HP, 3 to 5 full quarter-mile passes may be expected. If nitrous is only used in 2nd and 3rd gears, the number of runs will be more. *Also note that if you are running a purge kit, and using it, then you will also lose n2o this way*


Q: How long can I hold the nitrous button down?

A: It is possible to hold the button down until the bottle is empty. However 15 continuous seconds at a time, or less, is recommend. *In otherwords, no longer than 15 seconds at a time. This is particularly important, but usually never occurs since most races do not last this long. In addition to this, it must be noted that spraying in 5th Gear is also very much discouraged. 5th gear is not made to handle such large amounts of load on the motor and spraying in 5th has been known to cause many setups to "blow up". Also....try your best not to hit fuel cut (aka the rev limiter) while you are spraying. Rev limiter / Fuel cut will cut fuel to your motor and WILL make you detonate. Don't miss gears either especially if ur a power shifter.*


Q: When is the best time to use nitrous?

A: At wide open throttle only (unless a progressive controller is used). Due to the tremendous amount of increased torque, you will generally find best results, traction permitting, at early activation. Nitrous can be safely applied above 2,500 RPM under full throttle conditions. *You can, technically launch with your nitrous activated. Just be careful not to hit WOT during this time, until you have gained traction, otherwise you will not leave the "hole" and are most likely to bog out.There are products than u can get to help "idiot" proof ur n2o kit like a Window switch. MSD sells one that allows u to literally choose between how many RPM's the n2o will spray and stop spraying (for example between 3k and 6k.)*


Q: Will I have to rejet my carburetor on my car when adding nitrous?

A: No! The NOS system is independent of your carburetor and injects its own mixture of fuel and nitrous.


Q: Is nitrous oxide flammable?

A: No. Nitrous oxide by itself is non-flammable. However, the oxygen present in nitrous oxide causes combustion of fuel to take place more rapidly.


Q: Will nitrous oxide cause detonation?

A: Not directly. Detonation is the result of too little fuel present during combustion (lean) or too low of an octane of fuel. Too much ignition advance also causes detonation. In general, most kits engineered for stock type engines will work well with premium type fuels and minimal decreases of ignition timing. In racing applications where higher compression ratios are used, resulting in higher cylinder pressures, a higher fuel octane must be used as well as more ignition retard.


Q: Where can I get my bottle refilled?

A: There are many performance shops that can refill your nitrous bottle generally for around $20-$25.


Q: Is there any performance increase in using medical grade nitrous oxide?

A: None! NOS recommends and sells only the automotive grade, called Ny-trous Plus. Ny-trous Plus contains a minimal amount of sulfur dioxide (100 ppm) as a deterrent to substance abuse. The additive does not affect performance.


Q: Is it a good idea to use an aftermarket computer chip in conjunction with an NOS System?

A: Only if the chip had been designed specifically for use with nitrous oxide. Most aftermarket chips use more aggressive timing advance curves to create more power. This can lead to potential detonation. You may wish to check with the manufacturer of the chip before using it. The top manufacturers, such as Hypertech do make special chips for use with nitrous.


Q: How long does it generally take to install an NOS kit?

A: The majority of kits can be installed using common hand tools in approximately 3 to 5 hours. Instruction manuals are by far the best in the industry; and include specific installation drawings, wiring diagrams, and bottle mounting procedures as well as performance tips and a thorough trouble shooting guide. *Note that some kits (like the VENOM kit) will require much more wiring during installation. Electronic kits will more than often wire up to your injectors, and o2 sensor, thereby prolonging the process*


Q: Which type of manifold is better suited for a plate injector type of nitrous system, single or dual plane manifold?

A: As long as he manifold doesn't interfere with the spray pattern of the bars, either will work fine in most cases. The distribution is better with a single plane at high RPM. If your goal is to increase power by more than 200 HP, the single plane manifold is better.


Q: Does nitrous oxide raise cylinder pressures and temperatures?

A: Yes. Due to the ability to burn more fuel, this is exactly why nitrous makes so much power.


Q: Are there any benefits to chilling the nitrous bottle?

A: No. Chilling the bottle lowers the pressure dramatically and will also lower the flow rate of the nitrous causing a fuel rich condition and reducing power. On cold evenings you might run on the rich side. For optimal running conditions, keep bottle pressure at approximately 800-900 psi. *This is where a bottle warmer comes in handy. Note that most N2O refill stations will chill the bottle prior to filling it. Warming it up will increase the pressure. I believe the highest psi that should be used is 10000psi. You can always opt for a bottle warmer for this purpose.*NOS has a nitrous pressure gauge that allows you to monitor this. If you live or operate a nitrous system in colder climates, it may also be a good idea to purchase a bottle heater kit, part #14161. Generally, ambient temperatures of 70-90 degrees F. will allow for best power potential of NOS kits.


Q: Are there benefits to using nitrous with turbo or supercharger applications?

A: Absolutely! In turbo applications, turbo lag is completely eliminated with the addition of a nitrous system. In addition, both turbo and superchargers compress the incoming air, thus heating it. With the injection of nitrous, a tremendous intercooling effect reduces intake charge temperatures by 75 degrees or more. Boost is usually increased as well; adding to even more power.*see...told ya *


Q: What effect does nitrous have on an engine with considerable miles on it?

A: This depends largely on the actual condition of the engine components. Any performance modification to an engine that is worn out or poorly tuned will have detrimental effects. However, an engine in good condition, with good ring and head gasket sealing, should be able to use nitrous without any abnormal wear.


Q: Will the use of nitrous oxide affect the catalytic converter?

A: No. The increase in oxygen present in the exhaust may actually increase the efficiency of the converter. Since the use of nitrous is normally limited to 10-20 seconds of continuous use, there usually are no appreciable effects. Temperatures are typically well within acceptable standards.


Q: Will the percentage of performance increase be the same in a highly modified engine compared to a stock engine when using the same NOS kit and jetting?

A: Not really. In most cases the percentage of increase is greater from a stock engine because it is not as efficient as the modified engine in a normal non-nitrous mode. However, since the effects of nitrous oxide magnify the output of any engine, the total power output will be much higher in the modified engine.


Q: Can high compression engines utilize nitrous oxide?

A: Absolutely. High or low compression ratios can work quite suitably with nitrous oxide provided the proper balance of nitrous and fuel enrichment is maintained. NOS kits are used in applications from relatively low compression stock type motors to Pro-Modifieds, which often exceed 15 to 1. Generally, the higher the compression ratio, the more ignition retard, as well as higher octane fuel, is required. For more specific information talk to one of our technicians.


Q: Can service station fuel be used for street/strip nitrous oxide applications?

A: Yes. Use of a premium type leaded or unleaded fuel of 92, or greater, octance is recommended for most applications. Many NOS systems are designed for use with service station pump gas. However, when higher compression or higher horsepower levels are used, a racing fuel of 100 octane, or more, must be used.


Q: What type of cam is best suited for use with nitrous oxide?

A: Generally, cams that have more exhaust overlap and duration. However, it is best to choose a cam tailored to normal use (when nitrous is not activated) since 99% of most vehicle operation is not at full throttle. There are special cam grinds available for nitrous competition which have more aggressive exhaust profiles etc. Since cam selection depends largely on vehicle weight, gearing, etc., it is best to stick to cam manufacturer's recommendations for your particular goal.


Q: What type of nitrous system is better; a plate injection system or a direct port injection system?

A: The advantages of a plate system are ease of installation and removal, ability to transfer easily to another vehicle, ability to change jetting combinations quickly, and, in most cases, provide you with all the extra HP you will ever need (75 to 350 more HP). In some cases, such as in-line type engines with long runners, a direct port type system is advisable for maximizing distribution. *better more even fuel across the board*Also, where more than 350 HP is needed, our direct port Fogger systems will provide the ultimate in distribution and power (up to 500+ HP). Direct port injection is also desirable when the system is hidden under the manifold.


Q: Should I modify my fuel system to use nitrous oxide?

A: Most stock fuel pumps will work adequately for smaller nitrous applications. It is important to check to see if your pump can flow enough fuel to your existing fuel system (whether carburetor or fuel injected), as well as being able to supply the additional fuel required by the nitrous kit under full throttle conditions. It may be a good idea to dedicate a separate fuel pump to the nitrous kit.


Q: Which is the best position to mount a nitrous bottle?

A: N2Obottles come with siphon tubes and, in order to maintain proper nitrous pickup, it is important to mount the bottle correctly. It is recommend mounting the bottle at a 15 degree angle with the valve end higher than the bottom of the bottle. The valve end of the bottle should point to the front of the vehicle and the valve knob and label should face straight up.


Q: How important is it to use nitrous and fuel filters in a kit?

A: Some of the most important components of any nitrous system are nitrous and fuel filters that keep contaminants from attacking the solenoid or plugging up a jet. A stuck solenoid means trouble!


Q: What are the advantages of using nitrous compared to other performance options?

A: The cost of many other performance options can put you in the poorhouse. Dollar for dollar, you can't buy more performance with less money than nitrous. With a nitrous system, performance and reliability can be had for a much more reasonable price while retaining the advantages of a stock engine during normal driving. And, nitrous offers tremendous gains in torque without having to rev the engine to excessive rpm's. These factors help your engine last longer than many other methods of boosting horsepower.


Q: How do I know how much nitrous is left in the bottle?

A: The most reliable way is to weigh the bottle to determine how many pounds remain. When a bottle is near empty (about 20% or less nitrous remaining) a surging effect is normally felt.


Q: What is the function of the blow-off safety valve on the bottle?

A: It is very importent not to overfill a bottle; i.e., a 10 lb. capacity bottle should not be filled with more than 10 lb. of nitrous oxide by weight. Over-filling and/or too much heat can cause excessive bottle pressures forcing the safety seal to blow and releasing all the contents out of the bottle.


Q:Will I have to change my ignition system?

A: Most late model ignition systems are well suited for nitrous applications. In some higher HP cases, it may be advisable to look into a high quality high output ignition system.


OKieeeeee...i think that about does it. There's alot more that I can write regarding n2o accessories such as purge valves, bigger solenoids, remote bottle openers, fuel management, etc. But my fingers are kinda tired and I'll post here or edit this post later. ..........

Edit: I'm back. With a little info on some "optional" parts that you can purchase w/your N2O kits and their purpose.

Bottle Warmer/Blanket: This is a heated blanket that wraps (or rather straps, with velcro) around your bottle. When switched on it will warm up the bottle, expand the contents and thus increase the amount of PSi inside the bottle. Reason you might want to use it? Most people tend to like to run their pressure somewhere between 9 and 12 (thousand) psi. Most of these bottle warmer kits run on a relay. I've found most of these relays to become defective after a while. I find the easiest way is to bypass the relay, hook it up directly to a switch and just watch the pressure via an in cabin gauge. It can get risky though if you don't watch that pressure.

Purge System: It's how you see that famous white plume of n2o sometimes. It actually servese a purpose other than announcing you're spraying, believe it or not! LoL The purpose of a purge is to remove / clear your lines of any gaseous air from your main feed line. It does not necessarily have to be positioned somewhere where you can observe the white plume, although it is indicative that all is clear to go. Some people opt to position the purge towards the solenoids in order to cool them. A fairly cheap addition to your n2o kit.

In cabin gauges: First understand there are 2 types of gauges. Electical and mechanical. Electrical are fairly easier to install, but depend on your electric system, therefore any malfunction...well you know the rest. They are supposedly calibrated in the same fashion, but some say one is more accurate than the other. Your best bet is to research a little on this. I've always used mechanical and haven't had any issues. An in cabin gauge is mostly for convenience / tuning purposes. As in you don't have to run to your trunk to check the gauge on the bottle, and as in if you have ur warmer connected to a direct switch you can know when to shut it off w/out standing by the bottle watchin the pressure rise.

Remote bottle openers: Super convenient but have been known to not work as well the longer you have them. Remote bottle openers (obviously) hook on to the top of your bottle where you open and close it. This means, every time you take your bottle to get filled, you gotta remove it, and replace it once u put the bottle back in your car. I've noted w/alot of users that wear and tear causes it not to fully open / close the bottle at times. This could vary from person to person. It's convenient because, u don't have to run to the back of the car or reach behind ur seat to open and/or close the bottle. N2O at the flick of a switch!

Window/RPM switches: Most popular that I know of are the MSD window switches. Basically what this item allows you to do is control between what and what RPM you want to spray. For example if you would like to spray between 3500 and 7200 rpms, then you would buy the pack of "pills" that contain these rpm's. Some people worry about hitting rev limiter, etc. etc, or spraying too low in the rpm band. This would be a perfect "added safety measure" for those that worry about, for lack of a better term, going kaboom. Again, an added safety measure and you don't really NEEEEED this, unless you're scared and want some extra safety. IIRC (correct me if i'm wrong), these can be used in combination w/a throttle switch.





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