2004 ecotec 2.2 l61 turbo tune hpt - Page 2 - Tuning Forum

Forum Post / Reply
You must log in before you can post or reply to messages.
Re: 2004 ecotec 2.2 l61 turbo tune hpt
Friday, August 17, 2012 4:33 PM
Weatheralls Auto wrote:

First is to get your inj constant right
I believe it should be 0.10194
Reasoning is
The formula to get the correct constant is (old (or) stock injector flow / new injector flow)*old injector constant = new injector constant.

So 252 should be stock 440 with the 42s and your stock Inj Cont IIRC is 0.17800

So 252/440 = 0.57272727272 time 0.17800 = 0.10194545454

So Your Inj Constant would be 0.10194


yes i have the injector constant.

What would be the next step?
VE % ?

Re: 2004 ecotec 2.2 l61 turbo tune hpt
Friday, August 17, 2012 6:50 PM
I am now following this, as I have the same relative setup, and the same issues. PS, I need histograms.



I roll on steelies. Work-in-progress daily-sleeper potential.
http://www.j-body.org/classifieds/engine/60493/
Re: 2004 ecotec 2.2 l61 turbo tune hpt
Saturday, August 18, 2012 8:47 AM
Grab some configs here, there is one for AEM and one for LC1 widebands already setup

weatherallsautomotive.com/Jbody 1.2 AEM WB.zip


Read this post
http://www.j-body.org/forums/read.php?f=64&i=23787&t=23783#23787

Then do whats it the first post of this thread

http://www.j-body.org/forums/read.php?f=64&i=6694&t=6694
Shifted wrote:


To complete this how-to, you will need:

1. HPT EIO cable (cannot complete this with the standard cable)
2. Wideband set up to log in HPT
3. These histograms
4. Some time

Preparation
There are a number of steps you need to do to prepare for this. These must be done for the tuning to work accurately.

1. Turn off Closed Loop operation
a) To do this, open your current calibration file in the HPT Editor.
b) Go to Engine>Fuel Control>Open & Closed Loop
c) Open the ECT vs Startup ECT table
d) Set all the cells to 255
2. Set the target AFR
a) Go to Engine>Fuel Control>Power Enrich
b) Click on the Base AFR vs ECT
c) Set your desired AFR at each particular ECT.
d) Open the Mult vs RPM and set the multiplier for each RPM to hit the target AFR in that RPM cell
3) Turn off any injector pulsewidth modifications
a) Go to Engine>Fuel Control>General Fuel
b) Click on the IPW Multiplier vs RPM table
c) Set the entire table to 1.0
4) Make sure your injector constant is correct and working as desired
5) Save this file as VETuningCLDisabled.hpt (or whatever you want, just don't overwrite your working tune).
6) Go flash this file on to your car.

Logging

MAKE SURE your laptop is charged up, or that you are going to be doing blackbox logging, that you have the correct setup flashed on the cable. Sucks to go out and grab 40 minutes of data only to realize you forgot to add the wideband PID.

In the VCM Scanner, you need to be logging, at a minimum:
- Engine RPM
- Manifold Vacuum (if VE tuning a true 2 bar setup)
- TPS (if VE tuning a 1 bar or fake 2/3 bar setup)
- Wideband AFR
- Air Fuel Ratio Error (this is one of the important ones)
- Air Fuel Ratio Commanded (Lo Res)

***WARNING***
THIS IS WHERE YOU CAN BLOW UP YOUR CAR. If you are running untuned and without added fuel, especially in boosted applications, you can go lean and blow up your motor. If you fear this, you need to richen up your car before you start. Simply reduce the VE percentage in each of the cells until you are running pig rich. Then go ahead with tuning.

Now that you've disabled closed loop and flashed that file, go out and do some logging. Make sure to hit as many RPM/TPS points or RPM/MAP points as possible, and as many times as possible. If you are tuning the High RPM VE table, then cruising really doesn't matter, and neither does decelleration, but do your best to hit what you can. If you are tuning the Low RPM VE table, you want to spend as much time as you can at low throttle cruising situations. This will definately help with your gas mileage, but most of us do the High RPM VE tables first, its your call.

After you've got a good set of data, you're ready to move on to the next step:

Analyzing the Data

Remember those histograms you got way up at the top? Time to break them out.

1. Load up the VCM Scanner with your most recent data log.
2. Click Displays>Histograms.
3. Click on the Open Folder icon on the top left corner of the screen
4. Select the proper histogram to use.
5. Right click inside the histogram, click "Load All Data"

You now have a histogram that shows the AFR error throughout the RPM range, in a table that looks EXACTLY like the VE table that you are tuning. Time for the next step...

Tuning the VE

Now, this is the fun part...

Make sure you have the histogram open, and have the VCM Editor open with your current calibration, and the VE table that you are tuning open.

In the VCM Scanner
1. Select all the cells in the histogram, click in the first cell and drag all the way to the bottom right corner of the table.
2. Right Click, select Copy

In the VCM Editor
1. Select all the cells in the VE table, click in the first cell and drag all the way to the bottom right corner of the table.
2. Right click, Paste Special> Add

And thats it! You may want to repeat this process a number of times to get the VE just right, but its about that simple.

After-thought on VE Smoothing
Having a smooth VE table (no peaks or sudden transisitions), is important to have an even fueling. After you get done VE tuning, make sure to smooth your VE tables one or two times, and smooth out any peaks or valleys that you have. This is important in getting your car running smooth and consistant.

After you are done
When you are done, make sure you turn the closed loop fuel back on.






http://www.weatherallsautomotive.com http://www.planethax.com/j-body
Re: 2004 ecotec 2.2 l61 turbo tune hpt
Saturday, August 18, 2012 3:32 PM
^^ That's what I've been looking for muahahaha. Thank you.

OP: Do as he says, once you figure out the wide band. Let us know how it goes.



I roll on steelies. Work-in-progress daily-sleeper potential.
http://www.j-body.org/classifieds/engine/60493/
Re: 2004 ecotec 2.2 l61 turbo tune hpt
Friday, August 24, 2012 11:44 AM
Weatheralls Auto wrote:

Grab some configs here, there is one for AEM and one for LC1 widebands already setup

weatherallsautomotive.com/Jbody 1.2 AEM WB.zip


Read this post
http://www.j-body.org/forums/read.php?f=64&i=23787&t=23783#23787

Then do whats it the first post of this thread

http://www.j-body.org/forums/read.php?f=64&i=6694&t=6694
Shifted wrote:


To complete this how-to, you will need:

1. HPT EIO cable (cannot complete this with the standard cable)
2. Wideband set up to log in HPT
3. These histograms
4. Some time

Preparation
There are a number of steps you need to do to prepare for this. These must be done for the tuning to work accurately.

1. Turn off Closed Loop operation
a) To do this, open your current calibration file in the HPT Editor.
b) Go to Engine>Fuel Control>Open & Closed Loop
c) Open the ECT vs Startup ECT table
d) Set all the cells to 255
2. Set the target AFR
a) Go to Engine>Fuel Control>Power Enrich
b) Click on the Base AFR vs ECT
c) Set your desired AFR at each particular ECT.
d) Open the Mult vs RPM and set the multiplier for each RPM to hit the target AFR in that RPM cell
3) Turn off any injector pulsewidth modifications
a) Go to Engine>Fuel Control>General Fuel
b) Click on the IPW Multiplier vs RPM table
c) Set the entire table to 1.0
4) Make sure your injector constant is correct and working as desired
5) Save this file as VETuningCLDisabled.hpt (or whatever you want, just don't overwrite your working tune).
6) Go flash this file on to your car.

Logging

MAKE SURE your laptop is charged up, or that you are going to be doing blackbox logging, that you have the correct setup flashed on the cable. Sucks to go out and grab 40 minutes of data only to realize you forgot to add the wideband PID.

In the VCM Scanner, you need to be logging, at a minimum:
- Engine RPM
- Manifold Vacuum (if VE tuning a true 2 bar setup)
- TPS (if VE tuning a 1 bar or fake 2/3 bar setup)
- Wideband AFR
- Air Fuel Ratio Error (this is one of the important ones)
- Air Fuel Ratio Commanded (Lo Res)

***WARNING***
THIS IS WHERE YOU CAN BLOW UP YOUR CAR. If you are running untuned and without added fuel, especially in boosted applications, you can go lean and blow up your motor. If you fear this, you need to richen up your car before you start. Simply reduce the VE percentage in each of the cells until you are running pig rich. Then go ahead with tuning.

Now that you've disabled closed loop and flashed that file, go out and do some logging. Make sure to hit as many RPM/TPS points or RPM/MAP points as possible, and as many times as possible. If you are tuning the High RPM VE table, then cruising really doesn't matter, and neither does decelleration, but do your best to hit what you can. If you are tuning the Low RPM VE table, you want to spend as much time as you can at low throttle cruising situations. This will definately help with your gas mileage, but most of us do the High RPM VE tables first, its your call.

After you've got a good set of data, you're ready to move on to the next step:

Analyzing the Data

Remember those histograms you got way up at the top? Time to break them out.

1. Load up the VCM Scanner with your most recent data log.
2. Click Displays>Histograms.
3. Click on the Open Folder icon on the top left corner of the screen
4. Select the proper histogram to use.
5. Right click inside the histogram, click "Load All Data"

You now have a histogram that shows the AFR error throughout the RPM range, in a table that looks EXACTLY like the VE table that you are tuning. Time for the next step...

Tuning the VE

Now, this is the fun part...

Make sure you have the histogram open, and have the VCM Editor open with your current calibration, and the VE table that you are tuning open.

In the VCM Scanner
1. Select all the cells in the histogram, click in the first cell and drag all the way to the bottom right corner of the table.
2. Right Click, select Copy

In the VCM Editor
1. Select all the cells in the VE table, click in the first cell and drag all the way to the bottom right corner of the table.
2. Right click, Paste Special> Add

And thats it! You may want to repeat this process a number of times to get the VE just right, but its about that simple.

After-thought on VE Smoothing
Having a smooth VE table (no peaks or sudden transisitions), is important to have an even fueling. After you get done VE tuning, make sure to smooth your VE tables one or two times, and smooth out any peaks or valleys that you have. This is important in getting your car running smooth and consistant.

After you are done
When you are done, make sure you turn the closed loop fuel back on.




This is exactly what i was looking for thanks for the post. PS need thankyou buttons on here lol
Re: 2004 ecotec 2.2 l61 turbo tune hpt
Friday, August 24, 2012 11:59 AM
what would be the desired afr for this setup?
Re: 2004 ecotec 2.2 l61 turbo tune hpt
Friday, August 24, 2012 12:41 PM
all the ve tables in historigrams wont work? not supported any suggestions
Re: 2004 ecotec 2.2 l61 turbo tune hpt
Friday, August 24, 2012 6:20 PM
Its mostly based on wide-band data. Make sure you have the wide band to pin 1 of the EIO, and the ground for the gauge to pin 5 I believe. That's the way I did it, but it's been giving me some issues (most likely ground loops on my end) ... but it works if you set it up that way.

The help file in the vcm suite... search EIO, and you'll find how to hook it up, read more while you're in there.

Edit:
AFR = 14.7
It's all in that config file... it's pretty much a handout tuning template. Really easy when you understand hot hpt works.


Edited 1 time(s). Last edited Friday, August 24, 2012 6:22 PM


I roll on steelies. Work-in-progress daily-sleeper potential.
http://www.j-body.org/classifieds/engine/60493/
Re: 2004 ecotec 2.2 l61 turbo tune hpt
Thursday, September 06, 2012 11:11 AM
i have a slight issue with the ve tables im thinking my injectors are not big enough. Ive maxed out the 100% tps table at 199 and still not right. Is there a way i can make the injectors open longer to compensate for this issue or should i just fork out another 400 for 750cc injectors?

Im thinking if i boost up the injector const this may open injectors longer?
Im currently running 42lb injectors.
I was able to get a bit more out by raising my fuel pressure but not my fuel pressure is at 65psi not sure if i can go more.
My VE histogram shows i need to add 15.5 on a table thats maxed at 199.

Any suggestions?

Thanks for all the help you guys have given me
Re: 2004 ecotec 2.2 l61 turbo tune hpt
Monday, September 10, 2012 2:28 AM
What is your wideband reading at 100% throttle while you're driving?

your injectors are fine, its the lack of tune.

don't mess with the constant or the fuel pressure in my opinion. the injector constant is just that... a constant, a number to reference to tell the computer how big the injectors are. when you change it to something that's not right, it throws everything else off.

You should be fine also at 50 psi static FP, another thing that throws the entire tune into the trash when you start changing it.



I roll on steelies. Work-in-progress daily-sleeper potential.
http://www.j-body.org/classifieds/engine/60493/
Re: 2004 ecotec 2.2 l61 turbo tune hpt
Monday, September 10, 2012 7:33 AM
I have seen your logs, your very rich not lean.
I do not think you will be able to keep your VE Offset at 100



http://www.weatherallsautomotive.com http://www.planethax.com/j-body

Re: 2004 ecotec 2.2 l61 turbo tune hpt
Thursday, October 11, 2012 7:32 PM
can someone tell me how to set up the histograms what pid or sensors to use with which tables. the link for histograms dont load it tells me unable to parse log.
Forum Post / Reply
You must log in before you can post or reply to messages.

 

Start New Topic Advanced Search