HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics) - Page 6 - Interior Forum

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DASH
Thursday, May 25, 2006 7:15 PM
so how do i get the glossy look on my vinyl dash?

Re: DASH
Thursday, May 25, 2006 8:05 PM
thats what we call FIBERGLASS


Re: DASH
Sunday, May 28, 2006 8:58 AM
2 questions. When you're on your primering step what's the last thing to do before paint. Sanding or spraying?
On your polishing step, what is the wax stripper? Anything like a blow up doll?
Re: DASH
Sunday, May 28, 2006 9:25 AM
spraying? you spray the primer then you sand it..once its smooth then you clean and apply paint...wax stripper? well..it didnt turn out to well for me so i personally skippedthat step



Re: DASH
Sunday, May 28, 2006 9:37 AM
I guess I should have worded that first question a little better. Which is the last thing to do on the primering step before painting. Sanding or spraying a final coat of primer. But I think you answered it anyway. Thank you kindly.
Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Wednesday, September 06, 2006 9:44 AM
Omg this has been really helpful , this sould be a sticky lol (hint ,hint) lol



Beware the Rouge Dragon.

Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Wednesday, September 06, 2006 12:14 PM
Have a question...

Out of all who have painted their interiors does the interior plastics need a flex agent like the bumpers do to prevent cracking, peeling for the high use pieces? Or does Dupli-Color & Krylon fusion paints flexible enough for these pieces.
Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Thursday, September 07, 2006 9:00 AM
i never used any flex agent on my pieces, i used the same paint as the exterior of the car and going on 4 years without any issues.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/sndsgood/ https://www.facebook.com/#!/Square1Photography
Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Friday, September 08, 2006 8:36 AM
sndsgood wrote:

i never used any flex agent on my pieces, i used the same paint as the exterior of the car and going on 4 years without any issues.


Thought not, thanks.
Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Tuesday, September 12, 2006 1:30 AM
Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Saturday, December 23, 2006 2:46 PM
I am currently in the process of doing my interior black. I was wondering if it was ok to use Dupli-color AUTO SPRAY.
It is "Ideal for Trim Accessories"
Would that work just as good as the SUV/Truck paint?




Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Saturday, December 23, 2006 5:43 PM
i advise against it...i tried other dupli color products and it didnt turn out so well..and i did black as well...stick with the suv/truck



Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Sunday, December 24, 2006 7:05 AM
I actually used the vinyl and fabric paint by duplicolor, red and black. It came out really well, the colors are very bright and sharp, I also used a clear coat, I couldn't be more satisfied.



Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Sunday, December 24, 2006 1:59 PM
Alright so just the van/suv?
Ill see if i can get the black i want in the suv paint.



Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Wednesday, December 27, 2006 1:56 PM
im in the precess right now.... so much f**kin primer
Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Wednesday, December 27, 2006 4:23 PM
This isn't a sticky? What's up with that?

Reporting for sticky.



- Interior FAQ -
J-Body of Michigan -
Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Thursday, December 28, 2006 1:17 PM
Raptor (TRB0SDN) wrote:

This isn't a sticky? What's up with that?

Reporting for sticky.




Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Thursday, December 28, 2006 6:44 PM
I've been reading this post and it's been a very good post. I would like to add a few things to this paint process that I feel has been overlooked. I understand that this is a "low budget" mod, but safety should never be overlooked. I highly recommend you get some protective gear, especially if you plan on doing a couple of these. You know your friends are gonna want you to do there's. Go to the auto parts store and get some safety glasses, a cartridge type respirator for organic fumes, some powder free gloves. Paints, solvents, and other chemicals are very bad news for your lungs and skin. I've seen alot of people get very sick from breathing and just being exposed to simple rattlecans. Choose a well ventilated area. This does not mean your enclosed basement. If it's a garage, open the door. If it's cold weather, put a box fan with a simple A/C filter over it blowing out.... get the air moving. You have to get the fumes and solids moving. You don't want to be spraying in an enclosed space because your creating a potential bomb as well. If your spraying in a basement with no moving air... the fumes will build. Any electrical source is a potential ignition source, like flicking a light switch..... instant spark to iginite it. Just use your head on some of this stuff. Also, if your spraying in an enclosed space, get ready because the paint is going to dust everything. So, make sure whatever you don't want paint on, you cover it. Plastic is sold in rolls or you could just cut up 55 gallon garbage bags and cover stuff. This is especially true on white or metallics. Next thing you want to make sure there is nothing in your way when you paint this. You want to be able to move your work or you move around your work without stirring as much dust as possible. Raised stands on tables or hanging the work from cables works good. This also helps with your angles when your shooting the paint. Lighting is also very important. If it's dark, your gonna miss parts or create runs in your paint where you lay it on too thick. Have plenty of lighting. Last thing I would look at is where you walk... is it concrete or grass or what? Make sure it's clean. Walking stirs up alot of dust. You want to go in, paint, and get out. Your enviorment is going to greatly effect how much your hard work is going to pay off. Just simple observations like not painting in the same room you just sanded the piece in. It makes a diffrence.
Best case would be creating a little spary booth out of plastic with filters and fans to eliminate dust, but that might be taking it too far.

As for the painting process, It's a really good write up. I personally hate rattlecan paint. It's cheap and horrible. No two cans produce the same effect and sometimes not the same color. There is no telling how long the can has set on the shelf and that effects the paint alot. I've used every type of rattlecan paint in the world and I wouldn't give you the time of day for it. If you like painting stuff, I strongly recommend going to Uros or waterbased paints like Auto air. They take diffrent techniques to shoot, but you can control them, something you can't do with a rattlecan. Another downfall of the rattlecan is the spray pattern. Rattle cans produce a round cone shaped spray pattern. Not really idle for laying down consistent coats. But I know everyone can't afford spray equipment.

The only things I would add to the painting process that has been layed out, is a plastic adhesion promoter. It will help create a bond between the plastic and the paint. The primer is good, but trust me, the plastic adhesion promoter helps alot. Just use if after cleaning the plastic after sanding it and before priming. Bulldog plastic adhesion promoter is sold at wal-mart in a rattlecan and it works great. The other thing I would add is a tack rag. They are found at most auto parts stores that sell paint. After cleaning with a rag, then use the tack rag. The way to use a tack rag is take it out of the wraper and open it all the way up and let it hang in open air on something clean for 15 minutes. If you don't do this the tack on the tack rag is going to stick to your paint and create adhesion problems. After the 15 minutes, pick it up in the center like a knapkin and lightly wad it up like one of those scrub balls in the women use in the shower. Then take it and lightly... LIghtly.... dust over the work. Do this everytime you clean with a rag... sanding the plastic, clean, tack rag. Primer, sand, clean, tack rag. Even lint free rags leave particles. It helps a bunch. When your done with the rag... put it in a plastic jug or tupperware. You can use it on other jobs you paint, but remember the tack will wear out and it will build more and more junk on it. If it's a perfection job, get a new one. Stay with whatever brand of paint your using... if you use Krylon primer, then use Krylon base and clear. You don't want a interaction between diffrent types of paint. Some paints are enamels some acrylics... they don't mix well. The easiest way is to do a test panel or test piece before you go gun ho on your precious car. Get a junk panel piece, clean and paint it and see how well it turns out... if it looks bad, make adjustments and do it again until your ready to try it on your car. Nothing worse than getting midway through a job and the paint goes beserk due to interatctions. These tips should help boost you further in you search for creating a truely custom ride. It's like any other trade, it just takes alot of practice and screw ups to learn not only how to do it right, but faster and cheaper. I hope this helps someone out and if you need anymore help, I would be glad to help ya out. Good luck.





The world is a beautiful place.... but I wouldn't want to paint it.
Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Sunday, December 31, 2006 7:01 AM
Ditto on the use of a tack rag. It can help to eliminate most dust issues.
Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Saturday, March 17, 2007 4:46 PM
Good write up. One thing I have come to love when using rattle cans is a plastic snap on spray handle. You can find them in the paint section of walmart or at a paint store for just a couple dollars. It helps a lot. It feels almost like you are using a paint gun and its easier to hold the can. Plus you dont get that irritating paint ring on your index finger lol.

~Jeanna~
Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Wednesday, March 21, 2007 7:16 PM
i wish this was around about 3 months ago... lol i did my dash and im planning on redoing it because its not as smooth as i want it to be... great write-up might want to use an acrylic clear rather than cheaper clears.... the acrylic will form a nice hardened layer which will protect from scratching a lot better in case of accidental keying... etc...

Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Wednesday, March 28, 2007 7:10 PM
Awsome, gave me all the info i needed. Just one question, you said to sand if you want a smooth fiber glass look. i dont want that look, but should i just kinda lightly scratch it up any way? there is already a few minor scratches on the passanger side, i wanna get rid of thous and i tought light scratching before priming might help. thanks!
Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Wednesday, April 11, 2007 6:27 PM
Wow... i just want to paint my dash.. its in a sunbird.. want to keep the texture, so would i have to prime?? i dont think i should have to, i read.. but not really sure.. and for my vynal peices can i use the same clear coat?? thanks in advance for help

"Hondas are like tampons, every pussy has one!!!"
Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Sunday, April 29, 2007 7:14 AM
If you don't primer then you risk the paint chipping/flaking off and depending on how dark your interior pieces are, if you use a light grey primer the paint's color will be alot more vibrant and just come out better.



Re: HOW TO - Repaint Your Interior (Lot's of pics)
Sunday, April 29, 2007 8:32 AM
What primer would i use though? its a vynal dash, its grey right now, except for about the 9 coats if dupli color vynal paint that failed... what primer/paint/clear coat could i use? would the paint he used work for vynal? thanks

"Hondas are like tampons, every pussy has one!!!"
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